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13 comments:

  1. Fyi., Stanley: The Master Builder. Positive Characteristics: The 22 is the most powerful of all numbers, able to turn lofty dreams into realities. It is confident, pragmatic, ambitious and disciplined. Negative Characteristics: Impracticality and self-imposed pressure can get the better of the 22.

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  2. Bruce just told me that you write well! It looks like an amazing journey! MN

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  3. Stanley, I'm really enjoying your blog as well as the great pictures, what a great experience you and Brent are having. Can't wait for the next chapter.
    Robin

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  4. Wow! You want excitement on these enduurance rallies, but there is a limit... Seeing the sight and size of the hole, I was reminded of a different natural phenomenon, right here in Israel, which is quite scary - sink holes around the dead sea! [https://www.economist.com/science-and-technology/2017/12/13/a-way-to-predict-sinkholes-under-spas-near-the-dead-sea]
    Sharing your hope for a slightly less eventful future legs of the rally. Keep writing - it's truly engaging and lively.
    Shalom from Jerusaelm, Uri

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  5. David Sydney AustraliaSeptember 27, 2018 at 5:56 AM

    This is an amazing story - I am on the edge of my seat each day wondering what is going to happen next. The photos and descriptions are great. Best wishes to everyone.

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  6. I didn't realize it at first, but finally connected the dots when I saw a long item on Israeli TV on the weather challenges in Manali. Apparently there were quite a number of Israelis touring the area, and seeing the pictures you posted yesterday gave further context to the TV account of their trials and tribulations. Good to know that the organizers have been able to think up alternatives and find hotel accomodations for you. Clearly not an easy task given the circumstnaces. Looking eagerly to the next chapter... Shabbat Shalom from Jerusalem

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  7. Hey Stanley P.
    So glad you and Brant are past the moving water, mud and rain in what appears to be a more comfortable (??) manner.
    The dialogue and pictures (take more) are great.
    I'm sure the rest of the adventure will be fantastic, in the same way the previous ones have been.
    Drive safe, enjoy it all and best regards.
    Thanks to Brant for taking care of the car and SPG!
    Warmest,

    HMB

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  8. Stanley, thanks for keeping your readers around the glopbe updated! Clearly, these rallies are not meant for the faint hearted. I guess those montain winding roads quality as hakafot...
    The limited apples' menue brought to mind a great use for apples, which - if you did not have a chance to try, you may want to when you are in the Chicago area nest - Deep Dish Caramelized Apple Panchake! Delicious!

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  9. Fascinating, and as you wrote - miraculous at times. Found answers to the time zone question, probably more than you care to know, but here it is:

    India's standard meridian passes along the 82.5 degrees East longitude, which is towards the west of Nepal's apparent central meridian.

    But, the International Convention on time zones dictates that the standard meridian of a country be a multiple of 7.5 degrees, so that there is a difference of multiples of 30 minutes (7.5 × 4 minutes per degree = 30 minutes) between time zones. As you can see from the map, the convention means Nepal's standard time zone should be the same as India's.

    However, Nepal is one of the two exceptions to this convention, as it adopted in 1956. The 82.5 degree longitude divides Nepal into two very unequal parts, with the western portion covering a very small area. So it was decided that Nepal's Standard Meridian should pass through Mount Gauri Shankar (86°20' E), which lies 100 km east to Kathmandu. This is not a multiple of 7.5 degrees, and gives a standard time zone of approximately GMT+05:45, which is approximated to GMT+05:45.

    For more details: 15 minutes of fame


    Why is there a time different of 3:15 mins between Japan and Nepal?
    What went wrong between India and Nepal?

    The division of the world's time into flawless longitudinal segments has been a muddled illicit relationship. This is the tale of humankind's attempts to control time. It is the means by which 12:00 Greenwich Mean Time is likewise 22:30 in Lord Howe Standard Time (Lord Howe Island lies in the Tasman Sea in the middle of Australia and New Zealand), which is 17:14 on the moon in the (informal) Lunar Standard Time.

    There is currently Pyongyang Time to add to Greenwich Mean Time, Eastern Standard Time and Lord Howe Standard Time. Time zones are as much about legislative issues, discretion and resistance as they are about time.

    Geography does in some cases have enormous influence, as on account of Nepal. While about all nations have hourly time zones - some are half-hourly - Nepal is one of just two spots on the planet that has a quarter hourly time zones, the other being the Chatham Islands (in spite of the fact that Eucla in Western Australia informally utilizes GMT+8:45).

    Nepal is 5 hours and 45 minutes in front of GMT, on the grounds that it sets the meridian of Nepal Standard Time at Gaurishankar, is a mountain east of Kathmandu. The odd time contrast in the middle of Nepal and India has brought about a national joke that Nepalis are dependably 15 minutes late (or, Indians are 15 minutes early). It gets trickier in the North also South Poles, where all the longitude lines meet and in this way the shafts don't formally have time zones.

    Furthermore, with them came worldwide time zones. Set in 1884, it consented to utilize the Greenwich meridian as zero and measure 24 standard meridians on longitudes 15 degrees separated. In any case, it was not till 1956 that we set our looks surprisingly to Nepal Standard Time, with the meridian at Mt Gauri Shankar, 100km east of Kathmandu. It wasn't Mt Everest on the grounds that Gauri Shankar was closer to Nepal's focal point of gravity, so to speak. Read more Time Zones Interesting facts to know more.

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  10. Stanley -- it has been a wonderful adventure following your Porsche expeditions. Thank you for sharing the history, your thoughts and the pictures. You gave us a view of the world at a level and in ways unique. Your Porsche has come a long way since "Peking to Paris." Selfishly, I wish you weren't stopping, but this journey made it very clear why it is not just for cars but for riders too they call it an "Endurance Rally." Pauline

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  11. Joining in the thanks, Stanley. Clearly, reading about this amazing rally is nowhere near being part of it, but you have kept us informed, in suspense, inspired. And the final installment had a powerful sermonic value as well. A great way to enter Shabbat.

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  12. Stan,

    Congrats to Brant and you on the completion of this amazing adventure.
    Thanks for sharing all aspects of these travels, especially the the take on the people you've encountered. Few of us will ever experience these observations personally in our lives, but we do thank you for sharing what you've seen and felt.
    Travel safely, and enjoy the orchids.
    HB

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